Unmasking The Female Abuser

Narcissists are capable of intricate facades and carefully crafted lies no matter their gender.

Candace Ranee

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Image by, GettyImages

According to the American Psychiatric Association, 50–75% of those diagnosed with narcissistic personality disorders are male. However, narcissism is not confined to one gender or sexual identification. It is found in women and I believe it is more common than we think.

Simply because studies show that males are more narcissistic than females, this doesn’t mean women are not capable of abuse. If you have experience with narcissism, then you already know these disordered individuals never seek help for their maladaptive behavior. They just blame everyone else around them.

Their grossly inflated egos combined with a victim mentality mean the narcissist is never at fault.

The abuse that men and women report from their female narcissistic partners and or narcissistic mothers is the same pain that female abuse victims feel from their male abusers.

Abuse knows no gender! Abuse is abuse!

Abuse does not need to be physical or result in bruises to be considered painful, and help does not exist solely for women.

In my opinion all of the female abusers that should be part of the research fall under the radar because we live in a society that protects female abusers, particularly if you’re attractive, young, and white.

In this article, I will be discussing four reasons I think female abusers are so insidiously menacing.

Female Abusers Are Chameleons

Like all narcissists, female narcissists are deeply insecure. In an attempt to mask their insecurities or flaws, female narcissists tend to be overly concerned with their physical appearance and social image.

Female narcissists often overestimate their attractiveness and display or flaunt their physical attributes to get supply.

Women are socialized to objectify themselves, a narcissistic woman uses this social norm to try to assert her power.

They have the ability to morph into all different kinds of fictional characters. I’m sure most of us would not be surprised…

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Candace Ranee

Candace studied Sociology at Bowling Green State University. She is a writer and a DV Survivor